David Wild's Teaching

CURRENT AND UPCOMING COURSES

SPRING 2018: INFO I590 DATA AND SOCIETY (Co-TAUGHT WITH EDEN MEDINA)

This graduate course introduces technically-trained students to the social, political, and ethical aspects of data science work. It is designed to create reflective practitioners who are able to think critically about how collecting, aggregating, and analyzing data are social processes, and processes that affect people. It is structured as a lecture course with an emphasis on class discussion. Course objectives include teaching students: I. Ethical theories and frameworks, and how to apply them in the context of the data science profession; II. To recognize how social contexts and human values shape the creation of data sets, algorithms, and models;  III. To identify emergent ethical challenges in data science. Students will also be asked to consider whether, or to what extent, data science should be professionally regulated, and how they view their obligation to those who produce the data that data scientists collect and analyze. Grades are based on a midterm exam, final project, class participation, and homework assignments given throughout the semester. Students are  expected to complete assigned readings prior to class and express their ideas in writing.

SPRING 2018: DSCI D590 DATA SCIENCE IN PRACTICE (Co-TAUGHT WITH KYLE STIRLING)

This graduate course connects interested data science project sponsors with eager well prepared students so that both of these participants can accomplish together something that neither one could achieve alone. The goal for the course is for the students to experience the real-world work of Data Science in practice and complete short consulting projects. It also introduces students to different frameworks for data science in practice.

FALL 2017: INFO I400/590 Informatics in disasters and emergency response

Technology plays a critical role in prevention of, mitigation of, response to and recovery from threats to safety, and emergency and disaster situations. This undergraduate/graduate elective course engages students in thought-provoking and practical ways with the technology that can help – and sometimes hinder – from the perspective of three constituents: the students themselves, emergency managers, and emergency responders. Specific topics include designing for situational awareness and high stress situations; technology in big disasters; threat modeling, tabletop exercises, internet and social media resources, and data science / Internet of Things (IoT). There will also be talks from a variety of guest practitioners. Grading is through topic-based homework assignments, in-class quizzes and a real world individual project.

INTERESTED IN CHEMINFORMATICS?

The IDSL was founded on research in cheminformatics, and until recently we ran MS and PhD programs in cheminformatics (these are now absorbed into our data science programs). While we are not currently offering introductory cheminformatics courses for credit, if you are interested in learning more about cheminformatics, check out some of our learning materials and a PDF/Kindle eBook at LearnCheminformatics.com